Sunday, July 8, 2012

Confession: Does Organic Produce Spoil Faster?

I have a confession to make! I do not use organic produce (from the CSA Farm or the grocery store) in a timely manner. I have a habit of letting stuff sit in the fridge for at least one week before I even think about using it. Obviously, produce begins to wilt, soften, and spoils. I composted about 1/3 of the organic cherries yesterday because they were moldy. Organic cherries are expensive. I felt bad that I let 1/3 of them spoil.

Is this left over from my pre-organic days where food would last 2 weeks before it started showing signs of wilting/spoilage? I do not know. Is it because my husband and I have both been working crazy long hours and we do not cook as often anymore? Probably. My head is so full of work, chores, and everything else that I do not have time to craft yummy dishes to utilize the perfectly in-season produce that I buy or pick up from the CSA Farm.

At least I ate a decent breakfast this morning...


10 comments:

Angie said...

I'm not certain of the answer. I use both organic from my mom's garden and both organic & non-organic from the grocer. I learned while coaching 4-H food and nutrition teams for our county that storing foods can expedite spoilage i.e. storing certain foods that give off certain gases can speed up the process for other foods. Also whether they are stored on the counter top, dark pantry, or fridge makes a difference depending on the food.

To prevent losing food, I freeze a lot. I even have frozen cherries in the freezer for use in baking or making slushies or smoothies.

Angie said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
CelloMom said...

Now that our CSA is really starting to produce, I have to be mindful that I can actually use what I bring home. It's so easy to get greedy and grab everything that's in the share, but I've started to give some of the harvest away to friends, or make a larger contribution to the soup kitchen box provided by my CSA, particularly in weeks that I know I'll be cooking less. It's nice to spread the bounty around, and it's really nice to prevent the spoilage in my fridge.

rewinn said...

My very subjective impression is that the better fruits and veggies don't have a long long shelf life. As Michael Pollan says, "Don't eat anything that doesn't rot!"

I am a creature of habit. I am developing the habit of checking the kitchen just before be for any foods that need to be eaten tomorrow. It's a habit that's saved me from losing some nice food!

Kristina (The Greening Of Westford) said...

I am in a similar boat. I go through cycles when I am good about not letting foods spoil, then others where I feel like I am tossing foods right and left.

I found this website a while ago : http://www.stilltasty.com/
It explains how to store various foods to help them last as long as possible, and also how to store longer (ie freezing) I should start using it more!

LaAlicia said...

I like to freeze the excess or share it with friends and neighbors. I hate the thought of letting food rot when there are so many in this world who don't have enough! :)

My boss brings stuff in from her huge garden during the summer to share as well!

STF said...

I'm not certain either, but I have noticed my organic veggies do not last quite as long. The same thing happens with my bread that does not have preservatives. I am now trying to plan ahead and shop a bit more often.

I love that you use a CSA!

Meg Hodson said...

Does anyone know if GMO foods rot quicker? This time of year, I never buy tomatoes or berries that aren't organic. It seems that if I buy ones that are conventional, they look great in the store and are gross within a day! Thoughts?

Meg Hodson said...

BTW, now following via GFC. ;)

http://www.happykidsinc.blogspot.com

All Natural Katie said...

@Meg - I found that if I buy produce that is in season, it lasts a lot longer. Then again, it's hard to find yummy berries in the middle of winter.

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